BrexitCentral Daily Briefing

BrexitCentralBannerDarren Grimes
Deputy Editor, BrexitCentral, @darrengrimes_

There’s a three-pronged Cabinet attack on Brexit in the papers this morning. Theresa May and David Davis have given punchy interviews to two of the Sunday papers: Theresa May tells the Sunday Telegraph that Brussels must pay its own Brexit bill of billions of pounds for Britain’s share of the European Investment Bank and other joint projects, while Brexit Secretary David Davis uses a Sunday Times interview to warn the other 27 EU member states that they must moderate their demands for cash or face the UK walking away from the negotiating table altogether. Meanwhile, one of the Cabinet’s most pro-European voices, Damian Green, urges fellow former Remain voters to support Theresa May in this morning’s Observer.

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BrexitCentral: Your daily briefing

BrexitCentralBannerJonathan Isaby, Editor, BrexitCentral, @isaby

Quite a busy 24 hours on the Brexit front! Firstly, I wanted to draw your attention to a story which seemed to get no coverage yesterday from otherwise distracted broadcast media: it is the ruling from the European Court of Justice relating to the EU’s trade deal with Singapore, which concluded that in many key areas – not least financial services – any trade deal does not need to be ratified by every national and regional parliament in every member state.  While such ratification will still be required in some areas such as dispute resolution, the core of a trade agreement – goods, services and public procurement – will not be subject to national consultation. Overall this is “likely to help the British government” – not my words, but those of The Guardian, no less.

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Brexit Central Daily Briefing

BrexitCentralBannerJonathan Isaby, Editor, BrexitCentral, @isaby

Brexit has taken something of a back seat in the general election campaign over the last 24 hours, with the parties seeking to highlight policy in a range of others areas. Meanwhile, the business of government continues, hence Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson was in Brussels yesterday for a meeting with his EU counterparts at which closer co-operation on defence was on the agenda (remember when eurosceptics were chided and mocked for suggesting an EU army was in the planning?).

Jeremy Corbyn was Julie Etchingham’s guest for a one-on-one interview on ITV’s Tonight last night. Amongst other things, the Labour leader accepted in terms that free movement would end as a result of leaving the European Union (and by implication its single market) and that there would have to be a system of “managed migration”. Click here to watch a clip. But the newslinks below also include a report that interprets Corbyn’s latest words on the Brexit negotiations as a hint that as Prime Minister he would pay the mooted £85bn Brexit ‘divorce bill’.

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EU Arranging Greek ‘Treatment’ For UK – We Must Be Prepared To Walk Away Or Be Enslaved

BrexitCentral.comBrexit Central: Be warned – the EU will try to bully the UK with the same tactics it used against Greece

Written by,

Austin Mitchell was Labour MP for Great Grimsby between 1977 and 2015.

Yanis Varoufakis has done a service to Britain and to Brexit with his account of the EU’s bullying and painful punishment of Greece in his book, Adults In The Room: My Battle With Europe’s Deep Establishment. It shows that the EU allows nothing – democracy, sense or national feeling – to stand in its way.

Read full story: HERE

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Brexit Central: Your Essential Brexit Briefing

BrexitCentralBannerDavid Scullion, Deputy Editor, BrexitCentral, Monday, 1st May 2017

The revelations coming out of recent EU leader meetings with Theresa May remind many of us why we had a referendum in the first place. Outrageous demands, bullying tactics and the whole thing leaked to the media. In response she’s reiterated her threat to walk away without a deal.

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Brexit Central: To take back control of our courts, we must break free from the European Court of Human Rights

BrexitCentralBannerDuring the EU referendum campaign, the core message from Vote Leave was that a vote to Leave would be a vote to take back control over the UK’s laws, courts, money and borders. Of course, the majority of voters agreed.

Now we are entering the General Election, the opportunity is there to take back complete control of our courts by also repealing the Human Rights Act and breaking free from the European Court of Human Rights.

Read full story: HERE

BrexitCentral: The General Election will settle the questions the Brexit nay-sayers keep raising once and for all

BrexitCentralBanner

 

 

Jonathan Isaby

Written by

Jonathan Isaby is Editor of BrexitCentral

Since becoming Prime Minister, Theresa May has run a virtually leak-free tight ship, and so it was that her announcement of a General Election for June 8th took all of us in Westminster entirely by surprise.

Just a few hours before the PM came out of the door of Downing Street, I had been reflecting on last month’s YouGov polling – noting how seven in ten voters want the Government to deliver on the referendum result and how even the majority of those who voted Remain were not wanting to frustrate the delivery of the expressed will of the British people.

So it is all the more frustrating that there remains a vocal minority, particularly among the political class – and disproportionately represented in the House of Lords which has to give its approval to all the Government’s Brexit-related legislation – which has refused to accept the result.

Read full story: HERE

BrexitCentral: UK Taxpayers Funding EU Propaganda Centres

BrexitCentral.comDavid Scullion, BrexitCentral

Government lawyers are confident Britain has no obligation to pay the hefty £50 billion leaving bill some are suggesting we should owe the EU, with a government source saying: “Think of it like golf club rules. Once you leave the club, there is no obligation to keep paying.” A House of Lords Select Committee has come to the same conclusion on golf clubs, arguing that there is no ‘leaving fee’ in Article 50.

But for those worried that not enough taxpayers’ money is being spent on EU projects, we break the news today that the EU is set to launch a raft of ‘information’ centres in Britain. You can read the story here.

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BrexitCentral: How Gina Miller’s legal case will actually help reinvigorate the Commons

BrexitCentralBannerBy Darren Grimes

On the BrexitCentral site today, with the Supreme Court delivering its judgment on Tuesday as to whether Mrs May’s Government can trigger Article 50 to leave the EU without a parliamentary vote, we have a timely piece from Professor David Abulafia. He has co-authored a new Politeia paper, Triggering Article 50: Courts, Government & Parliament, in which he explores the effect of Gina Miller’s legal challenge on Britain’s democratic system, analysing where exactly sovereignty lies and looking into what role should parliament play. Click here to read what he has written for us about it.

Also on the site today, Charlotte Smith analyses Theresa May’s Lancaster House speech and the realistic prospects and opportunities available to global Britain once it takes back control. Click here to read it.

Darren Grimes
Deputy Editor, BrexitCentral

@darrengrimes_